Photos

The village of Ancón

In the 19th and early 20th century, Ancón was an elite upscale resort area. The elegance of that period is still present: Gardens line long walkways, which sit under balcony overhangs held up by colorful columns. The houses are often painted in bright pastels, and the center square is well maintained. A small bodega and a café with internet access are each just a 3-minute walk away.

Photo credit: Jessica Federle
Photo credit: Jessica Federle
Photo credit: Jessica Federle
Photo credit: Jessica Federle
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The waterfront

The Ricardo Palma house is a mere 2-minute walk from the waterfront, which can be seen from house’s veranda. The unique malecón stretches along a view of bobbing fishing boats. Naturally, the hub of activity is the pier. Here fishermen and restaurant owners gather, and humble food carts sell Peruvian street food.

Photo credit: Lauris Burns
Photo credit: Jessica Federle
Photo credit: Lauris Burns
Photo credit: Alison L.
Photo credit: Jessica Federle
Photo credit: Lauris Burns
Photo credit: Jessica Federle

House details and character

During the day, natural light peeks and pours in through ceiling-high wooden doors and windows. Little spotlights are cast on stubborn splashes of color, intricate metal knobs, cultural relics. The artistry of the house and its owner is evident.

Photo credit: Jessica Federle
Photo credit: Jessica Federle
Photo credit: Jessica Federle
Photo credit: Lauris Burns
Photo credit: Jessica Federle
Photo credit: Lauris Burns
Photo credit: Jessica Federle
Photo credit: Jessica Federle

The bedrooms

Each unique bedroom is brimming with personality. Most have immediate access to the veranda spanning the house, and natural light pours in through tall windows.

Photo credit: Jessica Federle
Photo credit: Jessica Federle
Photo credit: Lauris Burns
Photo credit: Rosalee P.
Photo credit: Rosalee P.
Photo credit: Alison L.
Photo credit: Rosalee P.
Photo credit: Rosalee P.

House interior

Skylights let the house easily breathe in the ocean air. The tall wood of the walls,  imported over a century ago from the United States, adds an element of the forest. In mornings and afternoons, natural light sets stained glass door and windows aglow. In evenings, the house can be neatly folded up for warmth and comfort.

Photo credit: Jessica Federle
Photo credit: Jessica Federle
Photo credit: Jessica Federle
Photo credit: Jessica Federle
Photo credit: Jessica Federle